The Homeless Campership Fund

A special initiative created by the Summer Fund in 1988, the Homeless Campership Fund (HCF) provides free summer camp experiences for vulnerable children living in Boston-area homeless shelters.

Each year, the Summer Fund partners with 20-25 shelters and transitional agencies to reach the most vulnerable youth in need of summer programming. The HCF collaborates with the Summer Fund’s network of high-quality camps, providing camp scholarships or “camperships” amounting to 400-600 weeks of camp throughout the summer at no cost to the homeless campers and their families.

The HCF is a vital resource for homeless families, most of whom have few if any options for providing their children with a safe, structured recreational environment during the summer months. Our camp scholarships are made possible through the generosity of corporate, foundation, and individual donors who direct their support to the HCF, and through the participating summer camps who underwrite a portion of the free camperships.

Homeless Campership Fund Partners

Asian Task Force (ATASK)
Casa Myrna
Casa Nueva Vida
Community Action Programs Inter-City (CAPIC)
Cross Street Shelter
Elizabeth Stone House
EMPathways
FamilyAid Boston
Hildebrand Family Self-Help Center
Housing Families Inc.
MHSA Scattered Sites
Nazareth Residence
Victory Programs – Portis and Chamblet Family Homes
Project Hope
Saint Ambrose Family Shelter
Sojourner House
Saint Mary’s Center for Women and Children
Transition House

Our Impact

Cultural Day has had a significant impact on MetroLacrosse’s ability to implement quality summer programming. This summer, our Coaches-In-Training program implemented lacrosse clinics for 32 community organizations, 23 of which were secured through the Summer Fund. Cultural Day gives us the opportunity to efficiently and cost-effectively secure partnerships with past partners as well as new organizations we haven’t worked with before.

— MetroLacrosse

Random Quote

Partnering with the Summer Fund allowed the Boston Harbor Island Alliance to expand its reach and support community visits that might not have been possible without the partnership. In addition to bringing children and youth to visit the islands, we were also able to raise awareness about the islands among the more than 390 camp counselors, campers, and parents who may not have known about us otherwise.

— Boston Harbor Island Alliance